The economic and technological factors that shaped the development of cities and urban life after 18

But while many fretted about traditional American life, others lost themselves in new forms of mass culture. The specific reasons that immigrants left their particular countries and the reasons they came to the United States what historians call push and pull factors varied.

Black activists and white allies worked to outlaw lynching. Others, like Jane Addams and settlement house workers, sought to impart a middle-class education on immigrant and working-class women through the establishment of settlement homes. Senate—endorsed such extrajudicial killings.

Mill villages that grew up alongside factories were whites-only, and African American families were pushed to the outer perimeter of the settlements. Vaudeville shows featured comedians, musicians, actors, jugglers, and other talents that could captivate an audience.

Manufacturing needed the labor pool and the infrastructure. To handle their vast new operations, owners turned to managers. A young Italian man might simply hope to labor in a steel factory long enough to save up enough money to return home and purchase land for a family.

Even Gladden came to accept donations from the so-called robber barons, such as the Baptist John D. Between andranchers drove a million head of cattle annually overland from Texas ranches to railroad depots in Kansas for shipment by rail to Chicago.

Rivers, Cities and First States, 4000–2000 BCE

Some white mill workers could even afford to pay for domestic help in caring for young children, cleaning houses, doing laundry, and cooking meals. Anxiety over female sexuality reflected generational tensions and differences, as well as racial and class ones.

Whites stuffed ballot boxes and intimidated black voters with physical and economic threats. Factories could operate anywhere at any hour. The film almost singlehandedly rejuvenated the Ku Klux Klan.

Their vast capital requirements required the use of incorporation, a legal innovation that protected shareholders from losses.

Twenty years later, it had three hundred thousand. Throughout the early s, the Dyer Bill was the subject of heated political debate, but, fiercely opposed by southern congressmen and unable to win enough northern champions, the proposed bill was never enacted.

Boosters campaigned for the construction of new hard-surfaced roads as well, arguing that improved roads would further increase the flow of goods and people and entice northern businesses to relocate to the region.

From their fear, anger, and resentment they lashed out, not only in organized terrorist organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan but in political corruption, economic exploitation, and violent intimidation.

And four million enslaved Americans—representing the wealth and power of the antebellum white South—threw off their chains and walked proudly forward into freedom.

Buffalo herds, grasslands, and old-growth forests gave way to cattle, corn, and wheat. Between andover twenty-five million immigrants arrived in the United States. The economic and social changes of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries—including increased urbanization, immigration, advancements in science and technology, patterns of consumption and the new availability of goods, and new awareness of economic, racial, and gender inequalities—challenged traditional gender norms.

So-called Jim Crow laws legalized what custom had long dictated. Generational differences exacerbated the social and familial tensions provoked by shifting gender norms. Lost Cause champions overtook the South. Federal, state, and local governments offered unrivaled handouts to create the national rail networks.

They sliced off pieces of his body as he screamed in agony. Their huge expenditures spurred countless industries and attracted droves of laborers. Change was not confined to economics alone. And it was increasingly common.

Bythe Edison Company had produced about seventy-five films suitable for sale and viewing. It not only illuminated the night, it powered the Second Industrial Revolution.

He returned home at midnight. Economic advances, technological innovation, social and cultural evolution, demographic changes: Did the new arrivals assimilate together in the American melting pot—becoming just like those already in the United States—or did they retain, and sometimes even strengthen, their traditional ethnic identities?82 Chapter 18 Industry, Immigrants, and Cities, — Chapter Summary Chapter 18 tells the story of late nineteenth-century northeastern urban and industrial development.

The Impact of Political, Economic, and Cultural Forces. By William Julius Wilson. T. hrough the second half of the. The Social and Educational Factors Contributing to the Outcomes of Black Males in Urban Schools, 34 percent of black children under age 18 lived in poverty, compared.

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Rivers, Cities and First States, 4000–2000 BCE

1. What economic and technological factors shaped the development of cities and urban life after ? How were the new cities different from the typical city before ? The new cities contained more population than ever before, "developed special districts included not only areas for finance, manufacturing, wholesaling.

The Economic and Technological Factors That Shaped the Development of Cities and Urban Life After PAGES 2.

1 Life in Industrial America

WORDS View Full Essay. More essays like this: Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University. Exactly what I needed. -.

The Impact of Political, Economic, and Cultural Forces. By William Julius Wilson. T. hrough the second half of the. The Social and Educational Factors Contributing to the Outcomes of Black Males in Urban Schools, 34 percent of black children under age 18 lived in poverty, compared.

Urbanization and the Development of Cities. The Earliest Cities. Urbanization is the process of a population shift from rural areas to cities, often motivated by economic factors.

1 Life in Industrial America

Learning Objectives. and they try to improve urban life by keeping it on a human scale.

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The economic and technological factors that shaped the development of cities and urban life after 18
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